Webinar for Aging Science Talks Chaired by Dr. Nichenametla

Webinar for Aging Science Talks Chaired by Dr. Nichenametla

OFAS Associate Scientist Dr. Sailendra Nichenametla will chair a webinar, “Sulfur Amino Acid Restriction – Moving from Animals to Humans”, for Aging Science Talks on October 20-21, 2021. The sessions will include presentations by Dr. Nichenametla, OFAS Associate Scientist Dr. Jay Johnson, and OFAS Assistant Scientist Dr. Zhen Dong. Dr. John P. Richie, Jr., (Penn State University College of Medicine), a member of OFAS’s Board of Scientific Advisors, will also be among the presenters. The complete program, including information on attending the Zoom sessions, is available here.

This series of talks was begun in March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic as a means of keeping aging researchers connected at a time when scientific conferences were being cancelled around the world. The talks have continued in webinar format with the support of the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research. For more information about the Aging Science Talks series, including dates and topics of upcoming talks, click here.

The dietary switch that may boost longevity and its correlation to SAAR

The dietary switch that may boost longevity and its correlation to SAAR

A new epidemiological study published in The BMJ explores the association between eating red meat and the risk of death, specifically how risk of death can be lessened through dietary change—decreasing red meat consumption while increasing intake of healthier animal and plant-based foods. This correlates with OFAS research in rodents demonstrating that a sulfur amino acid-restricted (SAAR) diet can increase lifespan and delay onset of age-related diseases. In general, meat and other animal-based food sources have high SAA while plant-based food sources such as vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and fruits have low SAA.

The study looked to produce evidence backing previous studies showing “that higher red meat consumption, especially processed red meat, is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer, and mortality.” Analyzing data from a cohort of 81,469 US health professionals (male and female) from a 16-year period, this study found 1) increases in red meat consumption, especially processed meat, are associated with a higher risk of death and 2) decreases in red meat consumption and simultaneous increases in healthy alternative food choices over time are associated with a lower mortality risk, further supporting the health benefits of replacing red and processed meat with healthy protein sources, whole grains, or vegetables.

To read the full article, click here

Zheng Yan, Li Yanping, Satija Ambika, Pan An, Sotos Prieto Mercedes, Rimm Eric et al. Association of changes in red meat consumption with total and cause specific mortality among US women and men: two prospective cohort studiesBMJ 2019; 365 :l2110