OFAS Hosting Session at AGE 47th Annual Meeting

OFAS Hosting Session at AGE 47th Annual Meeting

For years, Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science has researched biomedical interventions to prevent, halt, or reverse those disorders that decrease the quality or length of life. Our groundbreaking research on dietary methionine restriction has shown its dramatic ability to increase longevity while improving healthspan, lowering body weight, and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases.

In addition to our dedication to discovery, we are also committed to promoting the exchange of knowledge and strengthening of relationships within the scientific community. We host a biennial symposium on healthy aging, support meetings in the field, and, each year, our scientists represent us at conferences and seminars around the globe.

This year, OFAS will host a pre-meeting session at the AGE 47th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. The theme of the conference is “Improving Resiliency to Delay Aging”, and the OFAS-sponsored session is focused on Nutrition and Longevity. The panel of speakers includes: Dr. Sebastian Brandhorst from University of Southern California; Dr. John Newman from the Buck Institute and UCSF; Dr. John P. Richie from Penn State University; and Dr. Brian Kennedy from the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore.

OFAS Will Lead Their First Jane’s Walk

OFAS Will Lead Their First Jane’s Walk

The Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science is excited to announce that we will be leading our first Jane’s Walk in New York City this year. For those who do not know, Jane’s Walk is an event inspired by Jane Jacobs, an activist who greatly influenced urban renewal and city planning. These walks are an active memorial to Jane’s work and usually revolve around topics that identify with her ideals.

Our walk will be focused on addressing the quality of sidewalks in Central Harlem, which has some of the widest sidewalks in all of Manhattan, and discussing what attributes make a sidewalk more walkable than others. Medical research shows that walking can improve health outcomes in everything from heart disease and diabetes to improved mental and cognitive functions. Improving walkability can encourage residents to walk more in their neighborhoods.

Our Deputy Director, Bernardita Calinao, will be leading the walk along with our GIS Specialist, Marie Rusin. The walk will start in front of Red Rooster restaurant and you will find them holding a Jane’s Walk Flag that will also have our OFAS logo on it. Click here if you want to attend. The title of our walk is “The Quality of Central Harlem Sidewalks.” We look forward to seeing you there!

2017 OFAS Report of Directors

2017 OFAS Report of Directors

As we begin the new year, we at the Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science (OFAS) are reminded of how grateful we are for our friends around the globe. We are pleased with the advances in our research this past year and for the success of our symposia series in gathering fellow scientists to share progress and ideas. We are confident that our gatherings will continue support advancement in the field of aging.

We hope you will consider investing in OFAS’s research efforts with a donation. With each day that passes, advancements are made toward the goal of extending healthy lifespan, and each day OFAS is able to be a part of this work because of friends like you.

To view our recently published 2017 Report of Directors, click here.

Thank you for your part in making OFAS’s 2017 such a success!

Sincerely,

Dr. O's Sig       David O Sig
Norman Orentreich, MD, FACP                          David S. Orentreich, MD
Founder and Co-Director                                     Co-Director

Preliminary Findings on the Effects of Rapamycin on Cardiac Health of Companion Dogs

Preliminary Findings on the Effects of Rapamycin on Cardiac Health of Companion Dogs

Recent advances in geroscience have begun to explain the molecular mechanisms that link aging with disease, making age the greatest risk factor for most causes of mortality. Potential therapeutic strategies to delay age-related disability and disease and increase healthy lifespan have emerged. Among these is rapamycin, a drug intervention that has been shown to increase lifespan and healthspan in rodent models.

Companion animals are subject to similar risk factors, receive comparable medical care, and develop many of the same age-related diseases humans do. Dr. Matt Kaeberlein, of the Dog Aging Project, conducted a study of a small group of healthy middle-aged dogs receiving either a dose of rapamycin or a placebo. Dogs age similarly to humans, but their lives are much shorter and they age more quickly; therefore aging studies on dogs can yield answers in as little as three to five years, as opposed to human clinical trials that can take decades.  The results yielded no clinical side effects and an echocardiography seemed to show improvement in cardiac function. Based on these findings, another, longer study will be done with a larger group of dogs in order to confirm the effects on heart function and behavior. It will also help to determine whether there are differences in mortality and prevalence of age-related diseases.

Dr. Kaeberlein’s work in translational geroscience seeks to close the gap between promising lab findings and possible applications for humans and to improve the quality of life for pets and their owners. You can read his most recent paper here or you can watch his presentation from the joint OFAS-New York Academy of Sciences conference Aging and Nutrition: Novel Approaches and Techniques.

 

In Review: The Many Effects of Methionine Restriction

In Review: The Many Effects of Methionine Restriction

Our work at the Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science has proven that methionine restriction (MR) extends lifespan and has many beneficial effects on various systems in animal models. Rodent MR models have shown improved cardiovascular function, bone development, insulin sensitivity, stress tolerance, and glucose metabolism, as well as a reduction in body mass and cancer development. Some of these effects have also been documented in invertebrate organisms, such as yeast, nematodes, and fruit flies.

In order for these effects to translate to humans, it is crucial to have access to the appropriate food sources. Building on their previous research, Associate Science Director Gene Ables and Senior Scientist Jay Johnson utilized information from the US National Nutrient Database to compile a list of various food sources that contain methionine content in order to give individuals an idea of what foods are best for a low-methionine diet. It was revealed that food sources for beef contained the highest content of methionine, followed by other animal-based sources such as poultry, fish, and dairy, whereas food like nuts, vegetables, cereals, and fruit contained less methionine. According to the data found, in order to achieve MR, a person has to eat more plant-based food and less animal-based food. This supports the idea that a vegan diet, which is naturally low in methionine, could be beneficial to healthspan.

sources for methionine