The dietary switch that may boost longevity and its correlation to SAAR

The dietary switch that may boost longevity and its correlation to SAAR

A new epidemiological study published in The BMJ explores the association between eating red meat and the risk of death, specifically how risk of death can be lessened through dietary change—decreasing red meat consumption while increasing intake of healthier animal and plant-based foods. This correlates with OFAS research in rodents demonstrating that a sulfur amino acid-restricted (SAAR) diet can increase lifespan and delay onset of age-related diseases. In general, meat and other animal-based food sources have high SAA while plant-based food sources such as vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and fruits have low SAA.

The study looked to produce evidence backing previous studies showing “that higher red meat consumption, especially processed red meat, is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer, and mortality.” Analyzing data from a cohort of 81,469 US health professionals (male and female) from a 16-year period, this study found 1) increases in red meat consumption, especially processed meat, are associated with a higher risk of death and 2) decreases in red meat consumption and simultaneous increases in healthy alternative food choices over time are associated with a lower mortality risk, further supporting the health benefits of replacing red and processed meat with healthy protein sources, whole grains, or vegetables.

To read the full article, click here

Zheng Yan, Li Yanping, Satija Ambika, Pan An, Sotos Prieto Mercedes, Rimm Eric et al. Association of changes in red meat consumption with total and cause specific mortality among US women and men: two prospective cohort studiesBMJ 2019; 365 :l2110

2018 OFAS Report of Directors

2018 OFAS Report of Directors

As we begin the new year, we at the Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science (OFAS) are reminded of how grateful we are for our friends around the globe. We are pleased with the advances in our research this past year and for the success of our symposia series in gathering fellow scientists to share progress and ideas. We are confident that our gatherings will continue support advancement in the field of aging.

We hope you will consider investing in OFAS’s research efforts with a donation. With each day that passes, advancements are made toward the goal of extending healthy lifespan, and each day OFAS is able to be a part of this work because of friends like you.

To view our recently published 2018 Report of Directors, click here.

Thank you for your part in making OFAS’s 2018 such a success!

Sincerely,

Dr. O's Sig       David O Sig
Norman Orentreich, MD, FACP                          David S. Orentreich, MD
Founder and Co-Director                                     Co-Director

OFAS Successfully Hosted AGA Session

OFAS Successfully Hosted AGA Session

This year, OFAS hosted a pre-meeting session at the AGE 47th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. The theme of the conference was “Improving Resiliency to Delay Aging”, and the OFAS-sponsored session was focused on Nutrition and Longevity. The panel of speakers included: Dr. Sebastian Brandhorst from University of Southern California; Dr. John Newman from the Buck Institute and UCSF; Dr. John P. Richie from Penn State University; and Dr. Brian Kennedy from the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore. There were 261 attendees present at the meeting, including some directors for the Nathan Shock Centers and NIH-NIA.

For years, Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science has researched biomedical interventions to prevent, halt, or reverse those disorders that decrease the quality or length of life. Our groundbreaking research on dietary methionine restriction has shown its dramatic ability to increase longevity while improving healthspan, lowering body weight, and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases.

In addition to our dedication to discovery, we are also committed to promoting the exchange of knowledge and strengthening of relationships within the scientific community. We host a biennial symposium on healthy aging, support meetings in the field, and, each year, our scientists represent us at conferences and seminars around the globe.

 

OFAS Hosting Session at AGE 47th Annual Meeting

OFAS Hosting Session at AGE 47th Annual Meeting

For years, Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science has researched biomedical interventions to prevent, halt, or reverse those disorders that decrease the quality or length of life. Our groundbreaking research on dietary methionine restriction has shown its dramatic ability to increase longevity while improving healthspan, lowering body weight, and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases.

In addition to our dedication to discovery, we are also committed to promoting the exchange of knowledge and strengthening of relationships within the scientific community. We host a biennial symposium on healthy aging, support meetings in the field, and, each year, our scientists represent us at conferences and seminars around the globe.

This year, OFAS will host a pre-meeting session at the AGE 47th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. The theme of the conference is “Improving Resiliency to Delay Aging”, and the OFAS-sponsored session is focused on Nutrition and Longevity. The panel of speakers includes: Dr. Sebastian Brandhorst from University of Southern California; Dr. John Newman from the Buck Institute and UCSF; Dr. John P. Richie from Penn State University; and Dr. Brian Kennedy from the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore.

OFAS Will Lead Their First Jane’s Walk

OFAS Will Lead Their First Jane’s Walk

The Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science is excited to announce that we will be leading our first Jane’s Walk in New York City this year. For those who do not know, Jane’s Walk is an event inspired by Jane Jacobs, an activist who greatly influenced urban renewal and city planning. These walks are an active memorial to Jane’s work and usually revolve around topics that identify with her ideals.

Our walk will be focused on addressing the quality of sidewalks in Central Harlem, which has some of the widest sidewalks in all of Manhattan, and discussing what attributes make a sidewalk more walkable than others. Medical research shows that walking can improve health outcomes in everything from heart disease and diabetes to improved mental and cognitive functions. Improving walkability can encourage residents to walk more in their neighborhoods.

Our Deputy Director, Bernardita Calinao, will be leading the walk along with our GIS Specialist, Marie Rusin. The walk will start in front of Red Rooster restaurant and you will find them holding a Jane’s Walk Flag that will also have our OFAS logo on it. Click here if you want to attend. The title of our walk is “The Quality of Central Harlem Sidewalks.” We look forward to seeing you there!