The EAT–Lancet Commission on Diet, Healthspan, and Sustainability

The EAT–Lancet Commission on Diet, Healthspan, and Sustainability

Human health, diet, and environmental sustainability are prevailing concerns that share many common uncertainties. Fulfilling the nutritional needs of a growing population while limiting environmental degradation is a critical challenge that requires global collaboration and commitment. Current food systems, in addition to supporting unhealthy diets and practices, greatly impact the environment, leading to climate change, biodiversity loss, freshwater misuse, interference with the global nitrogen and phosphorus cycles, and land-system change. Current global food systems are simply unable to provide the population of ~7.7 billion with healthy diets while also achieving environmental sustainability.

The EAT-Lancet Commission brings together scientists and experts from the diverse fields of human health, agriculture, political sciences, and environmental sustainability in an effort to establish global targets for healthy diets and sustainable food production. Using the best scientific evidence available, the Commission seeks a global transformation of food systemsthat will help to achieve the goals set forth in the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Agreement. The SDGs are global goals reduce hunger and improve nutrition. The Paris Agreement sets a budget on greenhouse gas emissions to keep the global mean temperature increase to less than 2°C.

The EAT-Lancet Commission has quantitatively characterized a universal healthy reference diet that will positively impact both human health and the environment. This healthy reference diet consists predominantly of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, and unsaturated oils; includes a low to moderate amount of seafood and poultry; and includes no or little red meat, processed meat, added sugar, refined grains, and starchy vegetables. The commission has also rendered scientific boundaries that will aid in the reduction of environmental degradation caused by food production at all scales.

At OFAS, we have spent over 25 years studying how a low-methionine diet improves lifespan and healthspan. This diet consists primarily of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes and contains limited quantities of meats, seafood, and poultry—much like the the EAT-Lancet Commission’s healthy reference diet. Thus, a low methionine diet not only provides benefit to an individual’s health but also promotes a sustainable environment.

The EAT-Lancet Commission proposes five strategies to achieve the “Great Food Transformation”.
1. Seek international and national commitment to shift towards healthy diets
2. Reorient agricultural priorities from producing large quantities of food to producing healthy food
3. Sustainably intensify food production, generating high-quality output
4. Strong and coordinated governance of land and oceans
5. At least halve food loss and waste, in line with global SDGs

To read the full article, click here.

 

Willett, W., Rockström, J., Loken, B., Springmann, M., et.al. 2019. Food in the Anthropocene: the EAT–Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems. EAT-Lancet EAT–Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31788-4

Ables, G.P., and Johnson, J.E. (2017). Pleiotropic responses to methionine restriction. Exp Gerontol 94, 83-88.

OFAS Successfully Hosted AGA Session

OFAS Successfully Hosted AGA Session

This year, OFAS hosted a pre-meeting session at the AGE 47th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. The theme of the conference was “Improving Resiliency to Delay Aging”, and the OFAS-sponsored session was focused on Nutrition and Longevity. The panel of speakers included: Dr. Sebastian Brandhorst from University of Southern California; Dr. John Newman from the Buck Institute and UCSF; Dr. John P. Richie from Penn State University; and Dr. Brian Kennedy from the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore. There were 261 attendees present at the meeting, including some directors for the Nathan Shock Centers and NIH-NIA.

For years, Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science has researched biomedical interventions to prevent, halt, or reverse those disorders that decrease the quality or length of life. Our groundbreaking research on dietary methionine restriction has shown its dramatic ability to increase longevity while improving healthspan, lowering body weight, and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases.

In addition to our dedication to discovery, we are also committed to promoting the exchange of knowledge and strengthening of relationships within the scientific community. We host a biennial symposium on healthy aging, support meetings in the field, and, each year, our scientists represent us at conferences and seminars around the globe.

 

OFAS Hosting Session at AGE 47th Annual Meeting

OFAS Hosting Session at AGE 47th Annual Meeting

For years, Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science has researched biomedical interventions to prevent, halt, or reverse those disorders that decrease the quality or length of life. Our groundbreaking research on dietary methionine restriction has shown its dramatic ability to increase longevity while improving healthspan, lowering body weight, and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases.

In addition to our dedication to discovery, we are also committed to promoting the exchange of knowledge and strengthening of relationships within the scientific community. We host a biennial symposium on healthy aging, support meetings in the field, and, each year, our scientists represent us at conferences and seminars around the globe.

This year, OFAS will host a pre-meeting session at the AGE 47th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. The theme of the conference is “Improving Resiliency to Delay Aging”, and the OFAS-sponsored session is focused on Nutrition and Longevity. The panel of speakers includes: Dr. Sebastian Brandhorst from University of Southern California; Dr. John Newman from the Buck Institute and UCSF; Dr. John P. Richie from Penn State University; and Dr. Brian Kennedy from the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore.

NYAS Symposium – Aging & Nutrition: Novel Approaches & Techniques

NYAS Symposium – Aging & Nutrition: Novel Approaches & Techniques

OFAS and The Sackler Institute for Nutri­tion Science at The New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) joined together to present a conference on Aging & Nutrition: Novel Approaches & Techniques. A panel of leading researchers in these fields gathered to discuss the many powerful new techniques under development for use in studies of healthy aging. The con­ference was held on December 2 at The New York Academy of Sciences, 7 World Trade Center, New York, NY.

Ellis Rubenstein, NYAS President and CEO, gave the opening remarks on behalf of NYAS. Dr. Gilles Bergeron, Senior Vice President of The Sackler Institute, facilitated for the event. The first session, which focused on new approaches in aging research, was facilitated by Dr. Lenore Launer of the National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health. Speakers for this session were Dr. Arlan Richardson (University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center), Dr. Matt Kaeberlein (University of Washington) and Dr. Vera Gorbunova (University of Rochester).

OFAS Senior Scientist Dr. Jay Johnson moderated the second session, which focused on novel technologies that will play an important role in current and future studies. The panel comprised Dr. Nicholas Stroustrup (Harvard University), Dr. Vadim Gladyshev (Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School), and Dr. Jan van Deursen (Mayo Clinic). Our Associate Science Director, Dr. Gene Ables, gave the closing remarks on behalf of OFAS.

To watch the first hour of the conference, click here.

Upcoming Symposium: Aging and Nutrition: Novel Approaches and Techniques

Upcoming Symposium: Aging and Nutrition: Novel Approaches and Techniques

Several interventions have been identified that significantly extend healthy lifespan in mammals. Caloric restriction, for example, has been shown to improve healthspan in a variety of organisms, including rodents. Conversely, animals fed a diet with a normal caloric content, but with limiting amounts of the essential amino acid methionine, are up to 45% longer-lived than control animals. These and many other studies collectively demonstrate that alterations in nutrition and metabolism can have profound effects on healthy aging.

While studies are ongoing using conventional and established approaches to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying healthspan-extending interventions, many powerful new techniques are also being developed (e.g., genome engineering, high-throughput sequencing, DNA methylomics) that can be used to great effect for studies of healthy aging.

To explore the interplay between aging, nutrition, and metabolism, as well as the important role that novel technologies will play in current and future studies, Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science and The Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science at The New York Academy of Sciences are bringing together several preeminent researchers in these fields. The event will take place Friday, December 2, 2016 from 12:30 PM – 6:30 PM at The New York Academy of Sciences (7 World Trade Center, 40th Floor, New York, NY, USA).

Attendance for this event is limited in order to facilitate high level discussions and interactions. For additional information on the symposium, speakers, and registration, visit the NYAS website.