Targeted Removal of Senescent Cells in Adipose Tissue Improves Type 2 Diabetes

Targeted Removal of Senescent Cells in Adipose Tissue Improves Type 2 Diabetes

Research has uncovered evidence that adipose cells are highly susceptible to senescence, an irreversible state of non-proliferation, and the accumulation of senescent cells with age leads to the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)—a deleterious inflammatory condition thought to be a critical driver of age-related diseases. Obesity and age are top risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, and it would seem that therapies aimed at reducing SASP would be an ideal approach to improve this condition.

Fasting: The Critical Component of Calorie Restriction

Fasting: The Critical Component of Calorie Restriction

In 1935 Clive McCay published a paper demonstrating the pro-longevity effects of caloric restriction that would come to shape the future of longevity research. In McCay’s study, a simple 30% reduction of normal caloric intake was shown to impart robust gains in...

Can exercise prevent “inflamm-aging”?

Can exercise prevent “inflamm-aging”?

Researchers from Mayo Clinic have uncovered a novel way in which exercise may contribute to healthy aging by suppressing an age-related phenomenon known as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, or SASP. In recent years, research has uncovered a number of...

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