2022 Norman Orentreich Award for Young Investigator on Aging

2022 Norman Orentreich Award for Young Investigator on Aging

OFAS presented the third Dr. Norman Orentreich Award for Young Investigator on Aging to Maximilian Schmid-Siegel, a Ph.D. candidate at the Medical University of Vienna Institute of Medical Genetics (Vienna, Austria). The award was presented at the 15th International Symposium on Neurobiology and Neuroendocrinology of Aging, Bregenz, Austria. Maximillian was selected for his presentation “Ribosome heterogeneity by rRNA methylation in skin cell senescence”.

This award is intended to inspire young investigators to continue aging research and to acknowledge the potential of their work. In addition to the US$1,000 prize, Max was invited to present at the 2023 OFAS Symposium on Healthy Aging.

 

Symposium organizer Holly Brown-Borg, recipient Maximillian Schmid-Siegel, OFAS Deputy Director of Research Jay Zimmerman.

 

An intermittent form of methionine restriction protects against obesity and may extend lifespan

An intermittent form of methionine restriction protects against obesity and may extend lifespan

An intermittent variation of the dietary intervention methionine restriction protects against obesity and provides additional metabolic health benefits to mice, according to a study from the Johnson Laboratory, recently published in Aging Cell.

The results of this work are important in that they suggest that a limited period of dietary intervention (i.e., only three days per week) may be sufficient to produce the anti-aging effects associated with continuous methionine restriction. Such an approach could allow people to eat as normal for the majority of the week, but still receive the health benefits described for continuous methionine restriction.

Methionine restriction has been shown to protect rodents against diet-induced obesity and can extend their healthy lifespan by up to 45%. Promisingly, recent studies have suggested that the effects of methionine restriction on health and lifespan are likely to be conserved in humans. Given that the vegan diet is low in total protein and amino acids, methionine restriction is possible for people. However, such a diet might not be practicable or desirable for everyone.

As a result, the Johnson Laboratory sought to develop a version of methionine restriction that produces the same benefits as the continuous intervention, while also being more convenient and easier to perform. They were inspired by published reports that intermittent forms of other health-promoting interventions (i.e., the ketogenic diet and calorie restriction) are similarly effective to their continuous counterparts.

The team first tested whether two increasingly stringent versions of intermittent methionine restriction offered the same protection against obesity as the continuous intervention. They fed male mice one of four high-fat diets: 1) a control diet containing typical amounts of methionine, 2) a continuously methionine-restricted diet, 3) a diet containing typical amounts of methionine for four days, followed by a methionine-restricted diet for three days, and 4) a diet containing typical amounts of methionine for four days, followed by a diet completely lacking methionine for three days. The authors found that the more stringent of the two forms of intermittent methionine restriction was just as effective as the continuous intervention in protecting against the dramatic weight gain and fat accumulation seen in mice fed the high-fat control diet. Similarly, the authors observed that intermittent methionine restriction also completely protected female mice against diet-induced obesity.

Next, they explored the effects of intermittent methionine restriction on physiological changes that normally result from continuous methionine restriction. For this purpose, they measured the levels of four metabolic markers (the hormones IGF-1, adiponectin, leptin, and FGF-21) in blood samples from previously treated mice. As expected, they found that intermittent methionine restriction resulted in changes similar to those of continuous methionine restriction. This finding is particularly interesting given that a body of evidence suggests that low IGF-1 levels are associated with an extension of healthy lifespan. So, it is likely that intermittent methionine restriction will produce an extension of lifespan similar to what has previously been observed for continuous methionine restriction.

An image showing the comparative effects of continuous methionine restriction and intermittent methionine restriction in rodents on outcomes for obesity, hepatosteatosis, and dysglycemia.

Continuous methionine restriction (MR) extends the healthy lifespan of a number of model organisms, including rodents. A novel intervention featuring only three days of stringent MR per week (aka, intermittent MR; IMR) protects mice against diet-induced obesity, fatty liver (aka, hepatosteatosis), and dysregulation of blood sugar (aka, dysglycemia). It also produces beneficial changes in the levels of multiple energy-sensing and longevity-regulating hormones. As a result, IMR is likely a preferable health-promoting strategy to continuous MR.

“This is a very exciting result and actually one of the more significant findings to come from the Orentreich Foundation in recent years” notes senior author Dr. Jay Johnson, an Associate Research Scientist at OFAS. “In addition to protecting mice against diet-induced weight gain, intermittent MR also guards against the development of both fatty liver and dysglycemia. In fact, intermittent MR is actually more effective at maintaining normal blood sugar than classical MR … and this despite four fewer days of dietary intervention per week. Interestingly, mice undergoing intermittent MR also retain more of their lean body mass as compared with their continuously methionine-restricted counterparts. As a result, we consider intermittent MR to be a superior alternative to the classical intervention, and we hope that many of the benefits that it confers to mice will also hold true for humans.”

To view the article, published in Aging Cell, visit https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/acel.13629.

2021 OFAS Report of Directors

As we begin the new year, we at the Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science (OFAS) wish to thank our friends around the globe for their continued support. To view our recently published 2021 Report of the Director, click here.

We hope you will consider investing in OFAS’s research efforts with a donation. With each day that passes, advancements are made toward the goal of extending healthy lifespan, and each day OFAS is able to be a part of this work because of friends like you.

Thank you for your part in making OFAS’s 2021 such a success!

Sincerely,

David S. Orentreich, MD, FAAD
Director

Webinar for Aging Science Talks Chaired by Dr. Nichenametla

Webinar for Aging Science Talks Chaired by Dr. Nichenametla

OFAS Associate Scientist Dr. Sailendra Nichenametla will chair a webinar, “Sulfur Amino Acid Restriction – Moving from Animals to Humans”, for Aging Science Talks on October 20-21, 2021. The sessions will include presentations by Dr. Nichenametla, OFAS Associate Scientist Dr. Jay Johnson, and OFAS Assistant Scientist Dr. Zhen Dong. Dr. John P. Richie, Jr., (Penn State University College of Medicine), a member of OFAS’s Board of Scientific Advisors, will also be among the presenters. The complete program, including information on attending the Zoom sessions, is available here.

This series of talks was begun in March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic as a means of keeping aging researchers connected at a time when scientific conferences were being cancelled around the world. The talks have continued in webinar format with the support of the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research. For more information about the Aging Science Talks series, including dates and topics of upcoming talks, click here.

Dr. Norman Orentreich Award for Young Investigator on Aging Presented to Cristal Hill

Dr. Norman Orentreich Award for Young Investigator on Aging Presented to Cristal Hill

OFAS

Cristal Hill, PhD

presented the second Dr. Norman Orentreich Award for Young Investigator on Aging to Dr. Cristal Hill of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center (Baton Rouge, La., USA). The award was presented at the AGE 2021 Annual Hybrid Meeting Event, Madison, Wisc. With this award, we hope to inspire young investigators to continue aging research and to acknowledge the potential of their work. Cristal was selected for her presentation: “Age-related neuroprotection by dietary restriction requires OXR1-mediated retromer function”. In addition to the $1,000 prize, Cristal was invited to present at the 2021 OFAS Symposium on Healthy Aging.

Post-Doctoral Research Position Available

A post-doctoral position at the Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science (Cold Spring-on-Hudson, NY) is immediately available in Dr. Sailendra Nichenametla’s lab. Dr. Nichenametla investigates the mechanisms by which methionine restriction extends lifespan and confers metabolic benefits. The candidate will be working on a variety of methionine restriction projects associated with mechanisms, nutritional aspects, and prevention of diseases, including metabolic diseases, cancers, and proteostatic disorders. Responsibilities include generating data extensively from rodent models and occasionally from in vitro studies and specimens from clinical studies. The post-doc will perform experiments, data analysis, draft publication-quality manuscripts of their findings, assist in submitting grant proposals, and present work at scientific meetings.

Minimum Requirements:

  • A Ph.D. with 0-2 years of post-doctoral experience.
  • Demonstrable research experience in biomedical sciences and in two or more of the following areas/techniques: nutrition, aging, metabolism, immunohistochemistry, cell culture, molecular biology.
  • At least one paper as first author published in a peer-reviewed biomedical journal.
  • At least 1 year experience working with mice or rats.

Preferred:

  • 2-3 years’ experience working with mouse or rat models.
  • At least one paper published as first author in an aging, nutrition, or related journal.
  • HPLC experience.
  • Experience demonstrating surgery/dissection in mice/rats.

Please use this link to submit your application. Alternatively, you may email your application materials to snichenametla@orentreich.org. You will need to upload the following files:

  • Cover letter.
  • Full curriculum vitae including education or other academic appointments, complete publication record, and research skills listed in detail.
  • PDF of the most representative publication of your previous research.

H-1B visa sponsorship will be considered on a case-by-case basis.