Weight Loss and Concomitant Adipose Autophagy in Methionine-Restricted Obese Mice is Not Dependent on Adiponectin or FGF21

Weight Loss and Concomitant Adipose Autophagy in Methionine-Restricted Obese Mice is Not Dependent on Adiponectin or FGF21

Methionine restriction (MR) prevents obesity because of a futile lipid cycle in which two metabolic pathways run simultaneously in opposite directions and have no overall effect other than to dissipate energy in the form of heat. In this study, we show that MR promotes weight loss not just by this futile lipid cycle, but also by a coordinated response that involves apoptosis (normal cell death) and autophagy (a metabolic process by which the body consumes its own tissue) to maintain physiological equilibrium.

It has been observed that the hormones adiponectin and fibroblast growth factor 21 are consistently elevated during MR. To clearly define the roles of ADIPOQ and FGF21 during MR, we used mice that lacked either or both hormones. The obese mice, once placed on an MR diet, lost weight regardless of the presence of these hormones, demonstrating that neither is essential to reduce fat during MR.

To read the full article, click here

Cooke, D., Mattocks, D., Nichenametla, S. N., Anunciado‐Koza, R. P., Koza, R. A., & Ables, G. P. (2020). Weight Loss and Concomitant Adipose Autophagy in Methionine‐Restricted Obese Mice is Not Dependent on Adiponectin or FGF21. Obesity.

The dietary switch that may boost longevity and its correlation to SAAR

The dietary switch that may boost longevity and its correlation to SAAR

A new epidemiological study published in The BMJ explores the association between eating red meat and the risk of death, specifically how risk of death can be lessened through dietary change—decreasing red meat consumption while increasing intake of healthier animal and plant-based foods. This correlates with OFAS research in rodents demonstrating that a sulfur amino acid-restricted (SAAR) diet can increase lifespan and delay onset of age-related diseases. In general, meat and other animal-based food sources have high SAA while plant-based food sources such as vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and fruits have low SAA.

The study looked to produce evidence backing previous studies showing “that higher red meat consumption, especially processed red meat, is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer, and mortality.” Analyzing data from a cohort of 81,469 US health professionals (male and female) from a 16-year period, this study found 1) increases in red meat consumption, especially processed meat, are associated with a higher risk of death and 2) decreases in red meat consumption and simultaneous increases in healthy alternative food choices over time are associated with a lower mortality risk, further supporting the health benefits of replacing red and processed meat with healthy protein sources, whole grains, or vegetables.

To read the full article, click here

Zheng Yan, Li Yanping, Satija Ambika, Pan An, Sotos Prieto Mercedes, Rimm Eric et al. Association of changes in red meat consumption with total and cause specific mortality among US women and men: two prospective cohort studiesBMJ 2019; 365 :l2110

In Memoriam Norman Orentreich, MD

In Memoriam Norman Orentreich, MD

Dr. Norman Orentreich
1922-2019

It is with profound sadness that we announce the recent passing of our Founder and Co-Director, Dr. Norman Orentreich. Dr. O, as he was known to staff, was a visionary and a charismatic leader who brought a remarkable passion and energy to his work and research. An inspiration both professionally and personally, he will be dearly missed.

Since 2005, Dr. David Orentreich has served with his father as Co-Director of the Foundation. Now under his sole directorship, we will honor the life of Dr. O by continuing the mission he laid out on founding OFAS in 1961: biomedical research that prevents, halts, or reverses those disorders that decrease the quality or length of life.

A full obituary was published in The New York Times.

The EAT–Lancet Commission on Diet, Healthspan, and Sustainability

The EAT–Lancet Commission on Diet, Healthspan, and Sustainability

Human health, diet, and environmental sustainability are prevailing concerns that share many common uncertainties. Fulfilling the nutritional needs of a growing population while limiting environmental degradation is a critical challenge that requires global collaboration and commitment. Current food systems, in addition to supporting unhealthy diets and practices, greatly impact the environment, leading to climate change, biodiversity loss, freshwater misuse, interference with the global nitrogen and phosphorus cycles, and land-system change. Current global food systems are simply unable to provide the population of ~7.7 billion with healthy diets while also achieving environmental sustainability.

The EAT-Lancet Commission brings together scientists and experts from the diverse fields of human health, agriculture, political sciences, and environmental sustainability in an effort to establish global targets for healthy diets and sustainable food production. Using the best scientific evidence available, the Commission seeks a global transformation of food systemsthat will help to achieve the goals set forth in the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Agreement. The SDGs are global goals reduce hunger and improve nutrition. The Paris Agreement sets a budget on greenhouse gas emissions to keep the global mean temperature increase to less than 2°C.

The EAT-Lancet Commission has quantitatively characterized a universal healthy reference diet that will positively impact both human health and the environment. This healthy reference diet consists predominantly of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, and unsaturated oils; includes a low to moderate amount of seafood and poultry; and includes no or little red meat, processed meat, added sugar, refined grains, and starchy vegetables. The commission has also rendered scientific boundaries that will aid in the reduction of environmental degradation caused by food production at all scales.

At OFAS, we have spent over 25 years studying how a low-methionine diet improves lifespan and healthspan. This diet consists primarily of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes and contains limited quantities of meats, seafood, and poultry—much like the the EAT-Lancet Commission’s healthy reference diet. Thus, a low methionine diet not only provides benefit to an individual’s health but also promotes a sustainable environment.

The EAT-Lancet Commission proposes five strategies to achieve the “Great Food Transformation”.
1. Seek international and national commitment to shift towards healthy diets
2. Reorient agricultural priorities from producing large quantities of food to producing healthy food
3. Sustainably intensify food production, generating high-quality output
4. Strong and coordinated governance of land and oceans
5. At least halve food loss and waste, in line with global SDGs

To read the full article, click here.

 

Willett, W., Rockström, J., Loken, B., Springmann, M., et.al. 2019. Food in the Anthropocene: the EAT–Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems. EAT-Lancet EAT–Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31788-4

Ables, G.P., and Johnson, J.E. (2017). Pleiotropic responses to methionine restriction. Exp Gerontol 94, 83-88.

2018 OFAS Report of Directors

2018 OFAS Report of Directors

As we begin the new year, we at the Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science (OFAS) are reminded of how grateful we are for our friends around the globe. We are pleased with the advances in our research this past year and for the success of our symposia series in gathering fellow scientists to share progress and ideas. We are confident that our gatherings will continue support advancement in the field of aging.

We hope you will consider investing in OFAS’s research efforts with a donation. With each day that passes, advancements are made toward the goal of extending healthy lifespan, and each day OFAS is able to be a part of this work because of friends like you.

To view our recently published 2018 Report of Directors, click here.

Thank you for your part in making OFAS’s 2018 such a success!

Sincerely,

Dr. O's Sig       David O Sig
Norman Orentreich, MD, FACP                          David S. Orentreich, MD
Founder and Co-Director                                     Co-Director

OFAS Successfully Hosted AGA Session

OFAS Successfully Hosted AGA Session

This year, OFAS hosted a pre-meeting session at the AGE 47th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. The theme of the conference was “Improving Resiliency to Delay Aging”, and the OFAS-sponsored session was focused on Nutrition and Longevity. The panel of speakers included: Dr. Sebastian Brandhorst from University of Southern California; Dr. John Newman from the Buck Institute and UCSF; Dr. John P. Richie from Penn State University; and Dr. Brian Kennedy from the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore. There were 261 attendees present at the meeting, including some directors for the Nathan Shock Centers and NIH-NIA.

For years, Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science has researched biomedical interventions to prevent, halt, or reverse those disorders that decrease the quality or length of life. Our groundbreaking research on dietary methionine restriction has shown its dramatic ability to increase longevity while improving healthspan, lowering body weight, and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases.

In addition to our dedication to discovery, we are also committed to promoting the exchange of knowledge and strengthening of relationships within the scientific community. We host a biennial symposium on healthy aging, support meetings in the field, and, each year, our scientists represent us at conferences and seminars around the globe.

 

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